The play “Medea and other friends I made in Athens” compiles excerpts from the following major works of Ancient Greek literature, in order of presentation:

La pièce de théâtre “Médée et d’autres amis que je me suis fait à Athènes” est l’une des principales attractions de la ville d’Athènes. Joué quotidiennement, sur un toit magique juste sous l’Acropole, le spectacle est une compilation de six des plus célèbres tragédies et comédies de la Grèce antique.

C’est un incontournable, si vous cherchez des choses à faire à Athènes qui complèteront votre expérience grecque.

La obra de teatro “Medea y otros amigos que hice en Atenas”, es una de las principales atracciones de la ciudad de Atenas. Realizado a diario, en una azotea mágica justo debajo de la Acrópolis, el espectáculo es una compilación de seis de las tragedias y comedias antiguas griegas más famosas.

Es una visita obligada, si está buscando cosas que hacer en Atenas que completen su experiencia griega.

Театрализованная пьеса «Медея и друзья, которых я завел в Афинах», является одной из главных достопримечательностей Афин. Шоу, которое проводится ежедневно на волшебной крыше прямо под Акрополем, представляет собой сборник шести самых известных древнегреческих трагедий и комедий.

Это обязательно нужно увидеть, если вы ищете, чем заняться в Афинах, что дополнит ваш греческий опыт.

戏剧《美狄亚和我在雅典的其他朋友 》是雅典市的热门打卡景点之一。 每天在雅典卫城脚下一个神奇的屋顶上表演,表演汇集了六个最著名的古希腊悲剧和喜剧。

如果您想更加深入地了解古希腊文明与雅典这座千年古城,观看这部戏是您的不二选择。

Lo spettacolo teatrale “Medea ed altre amicizie che ho fatto ad Atene” è una delle principali attrazioni della città di Atene. Va in scena quotidianamente su un magico terrazzo, proprio sotto l’Acropoli, ed è una raccolta di 6 tra le piu’ famose Antiche Tragedie e Commedie greche.

È assolutamente da vedere, se stai cercando cose da fare ad Atene e renderà unica la tua esperienza greca.

“Odyssey” by Homer

Odyssey focuses on the ten-year journey and the many adventures of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy.

Excerpt No.1 features the meeting of Odysseus with the mighty Cyclops Polyphemus and the rough time he and his comrades had, trapped in the monster’s cave.

The writing of Odyssey is attributed to the blind poet Homer.

“Women in Power” by Aristophanes

Women in Power or Assemblywomen is a comedy written by Aristophanes in 391 BC. In the play, the women of Athens assume control of the government and instate anarchist reforms banning private wealth and enforcing sexual equality for the old and unattractive. The concepts of women holding power and anarchism aim to criticize the Athenian government at the time.

Excerpt No.2 features the adventure of a young Athenian who tries to meet his girlfriend while 3 very persistent old ladies block his way.

“Medea” by Euripides

The play is based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and it was performed in 431 BC at the City Dionysia festival. The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a former barbarian princess and the wife of Jason, when she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as her husband leaves her for a young Corinthian princess. Medea takes vengeance on Jason by murdering Jason’s new wife as well as her own children, after which she escapes to Athens to start a new life.

Excerpt No.3 features Medea in a monologue explaining the reasons that drove her to these actions.

“Prometheus Bound” by Aeschylus

The tragedy is based on the myth of Prometheus, a Titan who defies the gods and gives fire to mankind, an act for which he is subjected to eternal punishment.

Excerpt No.4 features Prometheus chained to a mountain when a chorus of Oceanides (daughters of Ocean) appear and attempt to comfort him.

“Antigone” by Sophocles

Antigone and Ismene are the sisters of Polyneices and Eteocles (all children of Oedipus), who died fighting each other for the throne of Thebes. King Creon, the new ruler of the city, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will lie unburied in the battlefield.

Excerpt No.5 features Antigone, who brings her sister Ismene outside the palace gates, in order to reveal her plan to bury Polyneices’ body.

Ismene refuses to help her, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself.

“Wealth” by Aristophanes

“Wealth” is an ancient Greek comedy by the playwright Aristophanes, first produced in 408 BC.

Excerpt No.6 features an Athenian citizen, owner of the slave Carion, who has gone to seek advice from an oracle. The instructions given by the god Apollo were for the Athenian to follow the first person he chanced upon meeting. That person turns out to be the god Wealth who is, contrary to all expectations, a blind beggar.

“Odyssey” by Homer

Odyssey focuses on the ten-year journey and the many adventures of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy.

Excerpt No.1 features the meeting of Odysseus with the mighty Cyclops Polyphemus and the rough time he and his comrades had, trapped in the monster’s cave.

The writing of Odyssey is attributed to the blind poet Homer.

“Women in Power” by Aristophanes

Women in Power or Assemblywomen is a comedy written by Aristophanes in 391 BC. In the play, the women of Athens assume control of the government and instate anarchist reforms banning private wealth and enforcing sexual equality for the old and unattractive. The concepts of women holding power and anarchism aim to criticize the Athenian government at the time.

Excerpt No.2 features the adventure of a young Athenian who tries to meet his girlfriend while 3 very persistent old ladies block his way.

“Medea” by Euripides

The play is based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and it was performed in 431 BC at the City Dionysia festival. The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a former barbarian princess and the wife of Jason, when she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as her husband leaves her for a young Corinthian princess. Medea takes vengeance on Jason by murdering Jason’s new wife as well as her own children, after which she escapes to Athens to start a new life.

Excerpt No.3 features Medea in a monologue explaining the reasons that drove her to these actions.

“Prometheus Bound” by Aeschylus

The tragedy is based on the myth of Prometheus, a Titan who defies the gods and gives fire to mankind, an act for which he is subjected to eternal punishment.

Excerpt No.4 features Prometheus chained to a mountain when a chorus of Oceanides (daughters of Ocean) appear and attempt to comfort him.

“Antigone” by Sophocles

Antigone and Ismene are the sisters of Polyneices and Eteocles (all children of Oedipus), who died fighting each other for the throne of Thebes. King Creon, the new ruler of the city, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will lie unburied in the battlefield.

Excerpt No.5 features Antigone, who brings her sister Ismene outside the palace gates, in order to reveal her plan to bury Polyneices’ body.

Ismene refuses to help her, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself.

“Wealth” by Aristophanes

“Wealth” is an ancient Greek comedy by the playwright Aristophanes, first produced in 408 BC.

Excerpt No.6 features an Athenian citizen, owner of the slave Carion, who has gone to seek advice from an oracle. The instructions given by the god Apollo were for the Athenian to follow the first person he chanced upon meeting. That person turns out to be the god Wealth who is, contrary to all expectations, a blind beggar.

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